Krabi

Krabi (Thai: กระบี่) is a town on the west coast of southern Thailand at the mouth of the Krabi River where it empties in Phangnga Bay. As of 2005 the town has a population of 24,986. The town is the capital of Krabi Province and Krabi district. Tourism is an important industry. It’s about 20km from Ao Nang

Things to do in Krabi

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Nopharatara BeachWat Tham Suea is a famous temple of Krabi. The name of the temple means tiger cave temple in Thai. Wat Tham Suea is located in the Khiriwong Valley approximately 9 kilometers northeast of Krabi Town, in the middle of forests and mountains with large trees over a hundred years old. Aside from being the site of a meditation center, the compound is also a place of archaeological and historical interest as excavations have uncovered stone tools, pottery remains and Buddha footprint crafting molds. In addition, a cave in the compound has what appears to be tiger paw prints in the stone. The name Wat Tham Suea derives from a story of a Buddhist monk name Jumnean Seelasettho. Around 1960s the monk wished to meditate in the caves then he saw tigers roaming around the cave. So the temple was named Tiger Cave Temple.

At Wat Tham Suea you will find two staircases wind up the limestone cliffs. The first one leads with 1,237 steps to the top of the mountain offering a superb 360-degree view and is definitely worth a try. Pillars on the staircase indicate how many steps you have already climbed and a monkey family lives around the stairs. Reaching the top will reward you with an incredible view and there is a huge sitting Buddha, a golden pagoda and a few other small constructions. The second one (only 130 steps!) leads into a valley where the monks live in simple huts.

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In the south of Krabi province (around 50km from Krabi and near the Khao Phra Bang Khram Nature Reserve), are nature’s own hot-tub Jacuzzis. The water here comes from thermal hot springs, originating deep underground in volcanic chambers. Located in the jungle, this site features naturally hollowed-out ‘bathtubs’ in the smooth stone, filled to the brim with running spring water at a pleasant 39-41°C. The mineral salts contained in the water are said to ease a number of ailments, including rheumatism, sciatica and skin complaints. Although these medical claims are unproven, the effect of simply lazing in hot water up to your chin, watching the clouds go by, certainly has positive health benefits.
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A visit to the Hot Springs would not be complete without a trip to the nearby Crystal Pool or Emerald Pool in Khao Phra Bang Khram Nature Reserve. Also known as Emerald Pool (‘Sa Morakot’ in Thai), this is an astonishly-hued natural pool at the centre of the forest, filled with clear spring water – although at ambient temperature 26-29°C Swimming is possible here.
The Picture shows the real highlight which is about 20 min. walk on a wooden trail through the rainforest with a view point tower and when you reach the final top you really get surprised by the crystal clear and blue Spring! (No swimming permitted) There is an entrance fee of 90 Baht for the hot springs and 200 Baht for Khao Phra Bang Khram Nature Reserve / Crystal Pool.

huay_toh_waterfallJust to the northeast of Krabi town is Huay Toh national park and waterfall that is a nice 1/2 day trip. Located approximately 500 meters from the Park’s office, this waterfall flows over rocks into 11 huge pools, each with their own name, such as Wang Thewada, Wang Sok, and Wang Chan. Another 3-tiered waterfall originating from a high-altitude cliff called Namtok Huai Sa-de is located some 1.2 kilometers from the Parks office. Apart from visiting waterfalls, adventurous visitors can trek to the peak of the Phanom Bencha Mountain, which is 1,397 meters high. This challenging and memorable activity takes at least 3 days and passes streams, waterfalls, caves and view points on high cliffs.

There is a short walk up to the Huay (Huai) Toh (To) waterfall and it’s a large path generally, nothing dangerous except when its raining a lot than the way can get a little slippery. It’s an easy hike and I think nearly anyone can handle it. Bring water anyway as it’s always very humid. The falls are nice, these pictures were taken during rainy season and so there is a good amount of water at the falls. During December through May there might not be so much water at the falls.

Note: Thank you very much Architect Jürgen Quattländer for the great Sortiment of pictures!!!
Note: Text Sandra Wohlfahrt Thank you very much!